2015 Golden Image Awards

GI LOGOFPRA’s awards program began in 1957. Now known as the Golden Image Awards, since 1968, the Golden Image Awards competition is conducted annually by the Florida Public Relations Association to recognize outstanding public relations programs in Florida and to encourage and promote the development of public relations professionalism in our state.

The Golden Image Awards have become a standard of public relations excellence in the state of Florida. Winners demonstrate the very best examples of innovation, planning and design. The awards competition includes four divisions of categories: Public Relations Programs, Printed Tools of Public Relations, Audio/Visual Tools of Public Relations and Student Projects in Public Relations. To qualify for judging, an entry must incorporate sound public relations research and planning. Entries also must meet the highest standard of production, execution and evaluation of results and budget.

Deadline to enter the 2015 Golden Image Awards is May 15. To enter, click here.

This year’s Golden Image Awards banquet, An Evening with the Stars, will held at the beautiful Omni at Champions Gate in Orlando on Tuesday, August 11 from 7 to 10 p.m.

APR - CPRC

 

Congratulations to the following public relations professionals who earned their APR or CPRC.

Accreditation is offered through the Universal Accreditation Board (UAB) to members of participating organizations, including FPRA. Though five years of public relations practice was previously required, ALL members are eligible regardless of years of experience. However, the objective, multiple-choice, computer exam does test a variety of knowledge, skills and abilities, so members interested in seeking accreditation need to be prepared in a variety of skill areas.

Earning professional public relations accreditation and receiving the designation of Accreditation in Public Relations (APR):

Jeff Marshall
Jeff Marshall, APR
Senior Communications Coordinator
Central Florida Expressway Authority
Orlando Area Chapter

 

 

L Trudell
Laureen J. Trudell, APR
Senior Director of Marketing and Communications
Orlando Economic Development Commission
Orlando Area Chapter

 

 

 

Certification is a unique, second tier credential offered exclusively to FPRA members. Candidates must have previously earned their APR and have ten or more years experience in the field of public relations. Though it is a second tier credential, it is not APR 2.0. This exam is a subjective exam that requires candidates to draw from their experience to solve problems and present solutions. Earning the CPRC credential involves passing a written exam (16 essay questions) and an oral exam (presentation of a public relations program or project).

Earning professional certification in public relations and receiving the designation of Certified Public Relations Counselor (CPRC) from the Florida Public Relations Association:

 

MUG2-L Byrnes 1-7-15
Laura Byrnes, APR, CPRC
Communications Manager
Careersource Citrus Levy Marion
Ocala Chapter

 

 

ACampbell
Allison Campbell, APR, CPRC
Public Relations Director
Jenkins Auto Group
Ocala Chapter

 

 

LVarner
Lisa Varner, APR, CPRC
Customer Relations Manager
Jenkins Acura/Jenkins Mazda
Ocala Chapter

 

 

For more information on Accreditation and Certification, as well as any available chapter or State Association rebates, please contact your local Accreditation and Certification Chair or Lanette Hart, APR, CPRC, VP Accreditation/Certification at Lanette.Hart@me.com.

Upcoming Webinar: 8 Imperative for Using Communications to Drive Change

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8 Imperatives for Using Communications to Drive Change 

April 10, 2015 | 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. EST

$25 for Members | $75 for Non-members
Discount Code for Members Only: Change

Communications has extraordinary power to drive change, when it’s practiced well. Often, those in leadership positions in change-oriented organizations think they don’t have time to communicate or develop a strategic communications plan. Christiano will offer eight rules to apply to the work you’re already doing to help you connect in new and tangible ways with your target audiences.

Takeaways from this webinar are:
• New Orientation to Existing Work
• Simple Rules that Can Apply Across Your Organization
• Focus on Tangible Results

 

FPRA Webinar SpeakerAnn Searight Christiano holds the Frank Karel Chair in Public Interest Communications in the College of Journalism and Communications at the University of Florida. She curates frank, an annual gathering of people who use strategic communications to drive social change, and is building a curriculum in the discipline at UF.

Ann came to UF from the Robert Wood Foundation, where she developed strategies to support the foundation’s investments in reducing violence, promoting play and improving long term care

To ensure an interactive and efficient program, virtual seats are limited. Registration is expected to fill up fast so don’t delay and register today!

 

Call for Nominations for the Joe Curley Rising Leader Award and 2015 Rising Leader Class!

RisingLeader

The Joe Curley Rising Leader Award and Rising Leader Class is intended to identify and honor up-and-coming individual FPRA members for their personal dedication to and demonstration of emerging leadership traits, along with dedicated, active involvement in FPRA chapter activities.

The Joe Curley Rising Leader Award includes a $500 cash award and a $500 FPRA state credit that the winner can use for state professional development seminars, workshops or annual conference registration. All members of the 2015 Joe Curley Rising Leader Class of 2015 will receive professional development credit in the amount of $150.

Nominees must be current FPRA members for a minimum of two years prior to nomination. It is up to the leadership of each chapter to select one candidate from their pool of nominations to represent their chapter. Only one nominee will be selected from each chapter. The selected representative will automatically be recognized as an official member of the Joe Curley Rising Leader Class of 2015.

Nominations should detail the role(s) the nominee has played in serving his or her local chapter on committees, developing programs, handling activities, serving as a local board member, etc.

Chapter leadership is encouraged to put forth a Rising Leader representative as well as help to invest in our Association’s future leaders. Nominees must complete the nomination form and submit it, along with an updated resume and a professional headshot, to their chapter president by March 31, 2015. One finalist will be put forth by each chapter. All finalists will represent the Rising Leader Class of 2015.

Access the nomination form by clicking here.

 

Congratulations to the following public relations professionals who earned their APR or CPRC in September of 2014.

Accreditation is offered through the Universal Accreditation Board (UAB) to members of participating organizations, including FPRA. Though five years of public relations practice was previously required, ALL members are eligible regardless of years of experience. However, the objective, multiple-choice, computer exam does test a variety of knowledge, skills and abilities, so members interested in seeking accreditation need to be prepared in a variety of skill areas.

Earning professional public relations accreditation and receiving the designation of Accreditation in Public Relations (APR):

 

Holly Boldrin
Holly Anne Boldrin, APR
Public Relations Manager
Priority Marketing
Southwest Florida Chapter

 

 

 

 

Deb Jonsson
Deborah Jonsson, APR
Public Relations Manager
Avow
Southwest Florida Chapter

 

 

 

 

JenniferOlivier2012
Jennifer Olivier, APR
Public Relations Manager
Florida Presbyterian Homes, Inc.
Dick Pope/Polk County Chapter

 

 

 

 

Certification is a unique, second tier credential offered exclusively to FPRA members. Candidates must have previously earned their APR and have ten or more years experience in the field of public relations. Though it is a second tier credential, it is not APR 2.0. This exam is a subjective exam that requires candidates to draw from their experience to solve problems and present solutions. Earning the CPRC credential involves passing a written exam (16 essay questions) and an oral exam (presentation of a public relations program or project).

Earning professional certification in public relations and receiving the designation of Certified Public Relations Counselor (CPRC) from the Florida Public Relations Association:

 

Heidi Otway Headshot
Heidi Otway, APR, CPRC
Vice President, Director of PR and Social Media
Salter>Mitchell
Capital Chapter

 

 

 

For more information on Accreditation and Certification, as well as any available chapter or State Association rebates, please contact your local Accreditation and Certification Chair or Lanette Hart, APR, CPRC, VP Accreditation/Certification at Lanette.Hart@me.com.

 

Demystifying the APR Computer-Based Examination for Accreditation in Public Relations: From Blueprint to Publication

APR

“The Examination is outdated!”

Have you heard that? Thought it? Said it? All of the above? We have too. “We” being the Universal Accreditation Board (UAB); and we have begun the very lengthy process to significantly update the Examination to ensure that all questions are current, relevant to the profession, accurate and valid. I’ll walk you through the process of how we are doing that, but first let me dispel the misconception that the Examination hasn’t been updated in years. We actually update the Examination in small ways throughout the year. More on that in a minute.

Let me start with the framework for the questions. We have a document called the blueprint. The blueprint lists each of the KSAs — the areas of knowledge, skills and abilities — that a candidate needs to successfully pass the Examination. And each of the KSAs has specific learning objectives — specific statements about what we are going to ask a candidate in this area.

For example, under the current KSA of RPIE, one of the learning objectives is Audience Identification and Communication. What we are trying to determine here is if the candidate can identify appropriate audiences and the opinions, beliefs, attitudes, cultures and values of each, and if the candidate can prioritize and properly sequence communications to different audiences.

Under the current KSA of Ethics and Law, one of the learning objectives is Integrity. Here the questions are going to be written to determine if the candidate recognizes and deals professionally with ethical and legal issues.

The current blueprint has 10 KSAs and a total of 43 objectives. Each objective has approximately three to five questions on the Examination. The proposed changes reduce the number of KSAs to six, and once approved, the number of objectives also could be reduced; however, the number of questions on the Examination will fluctuate very little, if at all.

Once we know what areas are going to be tested, we begin the process of item-writing, literally soliciting potential Examination questions. We seek input from subject matter experts and invite them to submit potential questions. In the past, questions were submitted by “the usual suspects” — current and former UAB members, those who had participated in the past, and Accredited friends and colleagues that we persuaded into volunteering a few hours of their time. In an effort to expand this pool of usual suspects, we’ve put a link on the Mentors/Teach section of the UAB website (PRAccreditation.org) that allows all practitioners to submit potential questions.

Item-writing sounds easier than it is, which perhaps is why the group willing to participate has remained small over the years. Each question needs to be supported through a reference in one of the books on our bookshelf. That not only validates the questions, but ensures that each question can be legally defended if we ever were challenged by someone who didn’t pass the Examination. To defend a question and its answer by saying, “Well, everyone knows that,” doesn’t quite cut it.

Once questions are written, they go through a technical review process. We assemble a panel of six to eight APRs to review each question and the answer options. We want to ensure that each question meets its objective; that it is clear and unambiguous, that it is challenging enough so that a person who is qualified to pass the Examination will answer it correctly, but a person who is not qualified to pass the Examination usually will not answer it right. We want to ensure that the correct answer is clearly right and the wrong answers are clearly wrong but not implausible. If a particular answer is too ridiculously incorrect, then no one will choose it. Likewise, providing choices with two answers that both could be right would not make a good question.

Each technical review session is booked for two hours, and we typically complete four to six questions per hour. (If this interests you, the volunteer line forms to the right.)

Once the questions are written and reviewed, they go into the testing cycle as beta questions. About a quarter of the Examination’s questions in any administration are in the beta phase. The candidate answers the question, but the answer — right or wrong — does not factor into his or her final score, because we don’t know yet if it is a statistically valid question. Of the 194 questions on the current Examination, there are 54 beta questions.

After at least 100 administrations of the Examination, our psychometrician conducts an in-service analysis of the entire Examination to provide statistics on how each question scored. The technical review panels are convened again to review the beta questions, but this time we have statistics behind them. For example, if few of the people who passed the Examination got a particular question correct, then that question is probably poorly structured or simply too hard; or if many of the candidates who failed the Examination got a particular question right, it’s probably too easy; or if most of the candidates who took the Examination did not select answer option D for a given question, that could be a bad distractor or a bad wrong answer. The technical review team might tweak the question a little bit — make the wrong answers more wrong, the right answers more clearly right, reword it entirely or throw out the question.

If a question is edited enough to influence how the next candidate would answer it (more than just making AP Style or similar corrections), it goes back into cycle again as a beta question. If it tests well, it can become a scored question.

This process of statistical validation occurs after at least 100 individual administrations of the Examination for all questions, not just the betas. A question that could have tested well for years, and many 100-application cycles, could begin to show poor results, perhaps because it’s no longer relevant or the aspect of the profession that it addresses has changed to the point that the question no longer is accurate. That question would be flagged for the technical review and be subject to revision. This is what I referenced when I mentioned early on that we do review and update the Examination in small ways on an ongoing basis. The Examination is always in a state of review and revision and being updated in small ways.

So if the Examination is always in a state of review and revision, what’s the excitement about this year?

The excitement is that we are proposing fundamental changes to the KSAs for the first time. When the KSAs change, the objectives must be revised. When the objectives change, all the existing questions must be realigned with new objectives so that their statistics match. Some questions might not align with a new objective, so they would need to be eliminated. And there could be new objectives that don’t have enough questions in the bank, so they would need new questions.

In addition to this realignment, the UAB’s Examination work group conducted an exhaustive review last summer of all of the scored questions to determine if they are current, relevant and accurate. Many that have been testing well were determined to need updating or serious rewriting; and when we make changes to a question, we’re back to beta (see above).

We’re talking about a significant number of new questions being offered this year, and with considerably more than one-fourth of the Examination having new, untested questions, we’re no longer looking at the existing Examination. We’re looking at an entirely new Examination, which translates to a full-on beta.

So once we get to this point of having a full beta Examination, we submit that new Examination to the testing center, which needs 90 days to prepare it for testing. This is called the publishing phase. Once it’s been published, we need another cycle of 100 candidates to take the beta Examination. Unlike the “regular” Examination in which none of the candidates have earned their APR, we need about 50 already-Accredited candidates to take the beta Examination to help validate the questions. Once we’ve completed the 100-application cycle, our psychometrician conducts another in-service analysis, we convene new technical review panels and tweak the questions, and we republish. Again. In between these phases, we also set the cut score, which is the threshold at which we determine what will be a passing score.

During the beta-test phase, the current Examination still will be available for candidates to take. Once the beta Examination is ready to be republished as the new APR Examination, we will have a temporary blackout window in which the Examination will not be available. This likely will be in the fourth quarter of 2015.

There are considerable steps in the process, some of which are controlled by the UAB (item-writing, technical reviews) and some which are not (in-service analysis, publishing). We’ve set an ambitious goal of having all of this completed in 2015 so that a new Examination can be ready by January 2016. And this just covers the Examination itself. In order for candidates sitting for the new Examination to prepare adequately, we need to update our study guide, the online course, Accreditation chair resources, and so on …

Hopefully I’ve demystified at least a few aspects of the Examination for you and shed some light on why we can’t just put out a new Examination sooner than 2016. In the event I’ve gone further and inspired the writer/editor in you to want to be part of the item-writing or technical review processes, please let me know. The invitation is open, and the UAB welcomes you to participate in this process.

 

Kathleen M. Giery, APR, CPRC
Chair, Universal Accreditation Board Examination Work Group
gieryk@lifequest.ufl.edu

Top 10 Reasons to Renew Your FPRA Membership

#FPRA Renewed_ standing ladyr

#FPRArenewed… Did You Renew?
By Mary Dorn, APR, VP Member Services

At 993 professional members and 173 student members, FPRA’s fiscal year is off to a great start in membership, with the Pensacola Chapter taking the lead at a more than 70 percent renewal rate. Thanks, Devon Chestnut, APR, VP of Technology, for our outstanding social media renewal campaign, #FPRArenewed. Soon, she will announce the $50 gift card drawing winner from the renewed members who used the special hashtag before October 31.

If you haven’t updated your membership, it has expired. There is still time to renew before December 31, when FPRA’s State Office removes non-renewals from its database, and to save money by avoiding the additional $25 reprocessing fee after that date. Please don’t wait until the busy holidays. Renewal online is easy at fpra.org.

Still undecided? Here are the Top 10 Reasons to Renew, provided by the Ocala Chapter:

  1. Network of public relations professionals (the #1 reason why recent survey respondents renew annually)
  2. Annual State Conference
  3. Regular chapter meetings
  4. State/local professional development meetings and state Webinars
  5. Local chapters throughout Florida
  6. State/local recognition
  7. Resourceful websites:  fpra.org and chapters’ sites
  8. Exclusive access to Professional Resources:  the White Paper, e-newsletters, etc.
  9. Counselor’s Network (which recently took an insiders tour of Universal’s Hallowscream)
  10. Professional Accreditation (Including a $100 testing fee rebate exclusively for FPRA members! If a professional is using the APR designation after her name, she must be a member of one of the UAB approved associations).

Congratulations to Immediate Past President Chris Gent, APR, CPRC!

Osceola Business Awards

Congratulations to immediate past president Chris Gent, APR, CPRC, who was one of three finalists for Osceola County’s 2014 Business Person of the Year Award. The award honors the achievements of an individual in Osceola County who exemplifies exceptional leadership within his or her business and beyond, and who has given of his/her time and expertise in making a better community. Chris serves as vice president of corporate communications for Kissimmee Utility Authority, Florida’s sixth largest municipally-owned electric utility.

 

Renew Your Membership & Win!

Have You Renewed Your FPRA Membership?

If so, tell us one reason why. Post your reason on Facebook, Twitter and/or Instagram. Make sure you tag FPRA and included #FPRArenewed. All eligible entries will be entered for a chance to win a $50 gift card!

#FPRA Renewed_ sign up lady

How to Participate:
•Renew your FPRA membership by Oct. 31, 2014
•Share one reason why you renewed by posting on Facebook, Twitter and/or Instagram. You can earn up to three (3) entries by posting to all three social media channels.
•You must tag FPRA in your post and include #FPRArenewed
•#FPRArenewed contest ends on Oct. 31, 2014

Chapters can win too:
Chapters with at least 50% of their renewed members participating in the #FPRArenewed contest will earn 2 points towards the Chapter Challenge.
Example: If your chapter has 50 renewed members and 25 participate in the #FPRArenewed contest, your chapter wins 2 points towards the Chapter Challenge.

Renew online at fpra.org or by sending in your completed renewal form.
Deadline: October 31, 2014

Tweeting Out the Love! A Collection of #WeLovePhotoJoe Tweets

When we honored “Photo Joe” Gallagher at this year’s annual conference, attendees showed their love by tweeting with the hashtag #WeLovePhotoJoe. We’ve made it easy for you to read the tweets by compiling them here…